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Sherman Oaks Laundry

Ted Houser, 2008. 

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self portrait 

self portrait 

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"What does this all mean for the future of independent film? It used to be that big stars who did indie films were brave trendsetters. Now they are just looking for a paycheck. The studio tentpoles have made it hard for even the most most famous actors, which may explain why Kristen Stewart would agree to star in a grim drama about Guantanamo Bay. And the Independent Spirit Awards and the Gotham Awards have been slowly transforming into the Golden Globes, where the celebrity nominees overshadow the real ingenues."

http://variety.com/2014/film/news/sundance-film-festival-brooklyn-1201068515/

Tags: sundance
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Dear friends at #Sundance

Dear friends at Sundance: you can stop pretending to like all the movies there. You’re not fooling me.

I promise you: I’ll see those movies at some point. I see everything. They’re bad. They’re all bad. They had Kelso play Steve Jobs. They program anything Josh Radner puts out. 

Hey! How about a terrible, mircobudget biopic of Allen Ginsberg or Joan Jett or Jack Kerouac or Allen Ginsberg again!?! Great idea! How about a preachy doc that recycles a book Michael Polan wrote 10 years ago?!? Perfect! 
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A film about veterans. A film about Detroit. Now fundraising.
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tedhouser/r-stern

A film about veterans. A film about Detroit. Now fundraising.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tedhouser/r-stern

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I got hammered with Oldboy. Are you ready to face his wrath?

I got hammered with Oldboy. Are you ready to face his wrath?

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My kind of video store

(via cinefamily)

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cinefamily:

DEATH BED: THE BED THAT EATS // Michigan // United States of Horror
 Sunday, October 13, 2013 // Midnite  CO-PRESENTED BY CULT EPICS. Insanely rare 16mm print, the only one in the entire world ever printed — plus, director George Barry’s daughter will be here to join us in person! Just when you thought you’d seen it all — murderous houseplants, elevators, computers, even tomatoes — along comes Death Bed: The Bed That Eats. Immortalized by comedian Patton Oswalt in one of his evocative on-stage comedic rants, this highly amusing bit of gothic surrealism takes place primarily within a stone crypt, where the only remaining piece of a demonic house sits in waiting for horny young thrillseekers to stumble upon it before digesting them whole. Though most obviously “horror” (with nods to familiar trappings like ghosts and flesh-eating), Death Bed also fits snugly within Seventies outré experimental conventions. In particular, director George Barry eschews rational plotting and dialogue exposition in favor of whimsical perversity along the lines underground filmmaker James Broughton, whose memorable 1968 short The Bed must have been a strong influence. Never really released after its lengthy post-production, Death Bed languished in the vaults after American distribution plans went belly up and a possible British distributor took off with a pirated copy. Fortunately for horror fans, Death Bed has finally emerged from his resting place to gurgle its way into your black, black heart. Dir. George Barry, 1977, 16mm, 80 min. $12, Free for Cinefamily Memberswww.cinefamily.org Cinefamily // 611 N Fairfax Avenue // Los Angeles // 90036

cinefamily:

DEATH BED: THE BED THAT EATS // Michigan // United States of Horror

Sunday, October 13, 2013 // Midnite

CO-PRESENTED BY CULT EPICS.

Insanely rare 16mm print, the only one in the entire world ever printed — plus, director George Barry’s daughter will be here to join us in person!

Just when you thought you’d seen it all — murderous houseplants, elevators, computers, even tomatoes — along comes Death Bed: The Bed That Eats. Immortalized by comedian Patton Oswalt in one of his evocative on-stage comedic rants, this highly amusing bit of gothic surrealism takes place primarily within a stone crypt, where the only remaining piece of a demonic house sits in waiting for horny young thrillseekers to stumble upon it before digesting them whole. Though most obviously “horror” (with nods to familiar trappings like ghosts and flesh-eating), Death Bed also fits snugly within Seventies outré experimental conventions. In particular, director George Barry eschews rational plotting and dialogue exposition in favor of whimsical perversity along the lines underground filmmaker James Broughton, whose memorable 1968 short The Bed must have been a strong influence. Never really released after its lengthy post-production, Death Bed languished in the vaults after American distribution plans went belly up and a possible British distributor took off with a pirated copy. Fortunately for horror fans, Death Bed has finally emerged from his resting place to gurgle its way into your black, black heart.
Dir. George Barry, 1977, 16mm, 80 min.

$12, Free for Cinefamily Members
www.cinefamily.org
Cinefamily // 611 N Fairfax Avenue // Los Angeles // 90036